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U.S. Marshals Service

History -  The First Generation of United States Marshals

The First Marshal of New Hampshire:  John Parker

John Parker served as Sheriff of Rockingham County, N.H., from 1771 until his appointment as Marshal in September 1789. He began this career under the royal governor, but apparently did the job so well that he gained appointment as Sheriff by the rebel government immediately after New Hampshire declared its independence from Great Britain. Thus, he and Clement Biddle were the only two of the first generation of Marshals to have law enforcement experience.

Born on Nov. 16, 1732, in Portsmouth, Parker apprenticed as a merchant. During his youth, he went on several voyages as master of a ship before settling down in Portsmouth to earn his living as a merchant and head of an insurance house. In 1775-76, Parker served as a captain in Biddle's New Hampshire Rangers, but he returned to Rockingham County to continue as Sheriff after that brief tour. Parker was the oldest man President Washington appointed to the office of Marshal. When he received his commission in October 1789, he was 56. Parker died in 1791 at the age of 58.

Allan McLane 1746-1825  Delaware Clement Biddle
1740-1814
 Pennsylvania
Thomas Lowry
1737-1806
New Jersey
Robert Forsyth
1754-1794
 Georgia
Phillip Bradley
 1738-1821
Connecticut
Jonathan Jackson
1743-1810
Massachusetts
Nathanial Ramsay
1741-1817
Maryland
Isaac Huger
1742-1797
South Carolina
John Parker
1732-1791
New Hampshire
Edward Carrington
1748-1810
Virginia
William Smith
1755-1816
New York
Samuel McDowell
1764-1834
Kentucky
Henry Dearborn
1751-1829
Maine
John Skinner
1760-1819
North Carolina
William Peck
1755-1832
Rhode Island
Lewis R. Morris
1760-1825
 Vermont
 
 
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